openSUSE, originally S.u.S.E was created in 1992 in Germany by four 4 people: Thomas Fehr, Roland Dyroff,  Hubert Mantel and Burchard Steinbild. The original meaning of the acronym was “Software und System-Entwicklung” or “Systems and software development” in English. It might have also been named after the computer pioneer, Konrad Zuse, who built the first electronic computing machine.

The company first began as a service provider offering manuals for Unix and Linux systems and software. They later decided that it was better to have their own distribution rather than correct the bugs of other distributions. They also believed that a better installation tool was necessary. SuSE developped YaST, a package manager which later became one of its strong features. The first S.u.S.E distribution was released in 1996. In 2004, Novell bought S.u.S.E and the company was named SUSE Linux. Later, in 2005 Novell decided to make the development of SUSE more open and launched the project OpenSUSE following the steps of RedHat’s community project initiative, the Fedora project.

The latest version of openSUSE as I write is the openSUSE leap 42.2. We will be installing this version of openSUSE on VirtualBox in this post.

  • The first step is to get the .iso file from the official openSUSE site.
openSUSE's official download page

openSUSE’s official download page

  • A new virtual machine needs to be created on VirtualBox. If you do not have VirtualBox installed you can get it from this link. It is a free software 🙂 !
openSUSE - Creating a new virtual machine

openSUSE – Creating a new virtual machine

  • Next, the amount of RAM that must be allocated to the Virtual Machine is chosen. For openSUSE I would recommend 2 GB since it will be running a GUI version.
openSUSE - choosing the amount of RAM for the virtual machine

openSUSE – choosing the amount of RAM for the virtual machine

  • We will start by creating the virtual hard disk that will be used for the openSUSE installation.
openSUSE - creating a virtual hard disk

openSUSE – creating a virtual hard disk

  • The next prompt allows the hard disk file type to be chosen. For this tutorial we will use the VDI (VirtualBox Disk Image). This is VirtualBox’s own container format for hard disks. VHD format is used by Microsoft and VMDK is used by other virtualisation products namely VMware.
openSUSE - Choosing the hard disk file type

openSUSE – Choosing the hard disk file type

  • The storage we will choose is “Dynamically allocated” so that the virtual machine uses space on our physical disk only when it fills up.
openSUSE - Choosing the storage type

openSUSE – Choosing the storage type

  • For this tutorial 8 Gb has been chosen for the hard disk but you may choose more. The disk space can also be modified  later in the virtual machine settings.
openSUSE - Choosing file system size

openSUSE – Choosing file system size

  • After going through these steps the preliminary setup of the virtual machine will be complete and the virtual machine’s details will be as follows:
openSUSE - Preliminary virtual machine setup

openSUSE – Preliminary virtual machine setup

  • Launch the virtual machine by clicking on start and select the .iso file you downloaded.

openSUSE - Choosing the .iso file

  • The installation process will start by displaying openSUSE’s logo
openSUSE - Boot image

openSUSE – Boot image

  • The following screen will be displayed and you will need to choose “Installation” by using the arrow keys and by pressing enter
openSUSE - Live CD options

openSUSE – Live CD options

  • The installation will be launched and you will need to wait for a little while. The following screens will be displayed :
openSUSE - Installation launch 1

openSUSE – Installation launch 1

openSUSE - Installation launch 2

openSUSE – Installation launch 2

openSUSE - Installation launch 3

openSUSE – Installation launch 3

  • A system probing will be launched to find devices connected (in this case the virtual machine’s  devices)
openSUSE - System Probing

openSUSE – System Probing

  • The user License Agreement will be shown and as usual it needs to be accepted in order to continue.
openSUSE - Accepting User Licence Agreement

openSUSE – Accepting User Licence Agreement

  • For this tutorial the online repositories have been chosen at installation. This will ease up updating software after the installation and also save the pain of manually adding the repositories later on. However, if you prefer to install the operating system faster you can do away with this option.
openSUSE - Choosing online repositories during the installation

openSUSE – Choosing online repositories during the installation

  • A suggested system partitioning will be shown. It is better to leave the default settings for the first time. Advanced uses may edit the proposal setting or configure completely different partitions.
openSUSE - Suggested partitioning

openSUSE – Suggested partitioning

  • The clock and time zone selection screen will then appear and chose them according to your location. This will help set your system clock as well as determine the nearest mirrors for downloading packages.
openSUSE - Timezone selection

openSUSE – Timezone selection

  • The network will be automatically configured and the online repositories will be downloaded on the next screen.
openSUSE - reading list of repositories

openSUSE – reading list of repositories

  • A list of repositories will be made available and you can make your choice of repositories. OSS is the main repository and is for open source software only. Non-OSS as the name suggests is for non open source software like Opera. Update is the repository for official bugfix and security updates for the OSS packages. Update. Non-OSS updates is for patching non free software. The other repositories are for Advanced users and developers.
openSUSE - List of online repositories

openSUSE – List of online repositories

  • The previously chosen repositories will be added before continuing with the installation
openSUSE - Adding the chosen repositories

openSUSE – Adding the chosen repositories

  • The main repository comes with a license agreement which need to accepted.
openSUSE - Main repository (OSS) License Agreement

openSUSE – Main repository (OSS) License Agreement

  • For the GUI you get several options and for this tutorial we are going to use the KDE Plasma Desktop.
opensusE - Desktop selection

opensusE – Desktop selection

  • The page for inserting user information then appears. It is better to have automatic login unticked for security reasons especially if you are installing openSUSE directly on your computer. If you want the root account to use different credentials untick “use this password for system administrator”
openSUSE - Local User information

openSUSE – Local User information

  • The following screen summarizes the installation settings which may be modified. Again default settings have been chosen in this tutorial.
openSUSE - Installation Settings

openSUSE – Installation Settings

  • Prompts will appear for package license agreements.
  • There will be one final confirmation before the packages are installed and the filesystem is created.
openSUSE - Final Installation confirmation

openSUSE – Final Installation confirmation

  • The installation will start and you may click on the details panel to view detailed installation progress.
  • When installation is complete the virtual machine will be rebooted and you will need to choose boot from hard disk this time.
openSUSE - Boot from Hard Disk

openSUSE – Boot from Hard Disk

  • Next choose openSUSE Leap 42.2 .
openSUSE - Boot menu

openSUSE – Boot menu

  • The login screen will be presented. Enter your credentials.
openSUSE - Login screen

openSUSE – Login screen

And voila! You can now explore openSUSE!

openSUSE - Desktop

openSUSE – Desktop

You can leave comments right below if you have any difficulties installing the openSUSE distro. I will be very glad to help you out. You can also ask your questions or tutorials you would like to see.

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